• GENERAL

    How do I retrieve a lost password?

    You can retrieve your username and password by following the instructions on the ABFAS sign in page. If you are unable to secure the information from the website, call ABFAS at 415-553-7800.
  • ANNUAL FEE

    Can I pay my annual fee by credit card over the phone?

    We encourage you to pay online. Sign in to your profile page to make your payment, verify your contact and licensure information, and confirm your agreement with the ABFAS privacy policy and advertising agreement. 

    If you are unable to pay online, please call 415-553-7800.
  • When should I expect to receive my annual fee invoice?

    Between July 15 and July 31.
    The annual fee for board qualified is $205.
    The annual fee for board certified is $350.
  • MEMBERSHIP

    What are the candidate types of ABFAS membership?

    Candidate:  A podiatric surgeon who has graduated from a CPME-approved residency program and is eligible to enter the ABFAS board certification process.le

    Certified:

    Ambulatory – A podiatric surgeon who became certified by the American Board of Ambulatory Surgery board before it joined with ABFAS.

    Foot and Ankle Surgery – A podiatric surgeon who became ABFAS certified pre-1991, holds hospital privileges, and has an active license.

    Foot – A podiatric surgeon who has passed the ABFAS Part I and Part II Foot surgery examinations, holds hospital privileges, and has an active license.

    Reconstructive Rearfoot/Ankle (RRA) – A podiatric surgeon who is certified in foot surgery and has also passed the ABFAS Part I and Part II RRA surgery examinations, holds hospital privileges, and has an active license.

    Board Certified podiatric surgeons are members of ABFAS with the title of Diplomate.

    Qualified: 

    Foot – A podiatric surgeon who has passed the ABFAS Part I Foot surgery examinations, holds hospital privileges, and has an active license.

    Reconstructive Rearfoot/Ankle (RRA)
    – A podiatric surgeon who has passed the ABFAS Part I Foot surgery examinations and has also passed the ABFAS Part I RRA surgery examinations, holds hospital privileges, and has an active license.

  • What are the status types of ABFAS certification?

    What are the status types of ABFAS certification?

    Active: An ABFAS Diplomate engaged in the active practice of podiatry, who has fulfilled all certification exam requirements and maintains current, active surgical privileges at a hospital or surgery center. An Active Diplomate has the right to vote on ABFAS matters and elections.

    Administrative: A member who is engaged primarily (more than 30 hours per week) in an administrative capacity directly related to the profession of podiatry such as:

    (a)     academic administration in a podiatric medical school/college.

    (b)     executive officer or staff of a podiatric medical association or society.

    (c)     employee of a hospital or health insurance carrier.

    (d)     consultant to podiatric or related healthcare organizations.

    Members must request administrative status on an annual basis in writing.  Letters should include:

    (a)     the reason for the request including how the member meets the qualifying conditions.

    (b)     a letter from the organization/institution confirming the member's administrative capacity.

    Members holding administrative status shall:

    (a)     continue to pay annual fees

    (b)     retain the right to vote in ABFAS matters and/or elections

    (c)     must successfully complete recertification or self-assessment requirements (with the exception of holding hospital surgical privileges)

    ABFAS will report the members’ status administrative for verification purposes.

    Members holding administrative status may request to return to active status.  The request must be in writing.  ABFAS will provide a six-month grace period during which time the member must demonstrate current, active, surgical practice by submitting proof of privileges from a hospital or surgery center.  If the member has not provided the documentation within the six months, their status shall revert to inactive.

    Extension: A board qualified podiatric surgeon who has received an extension for the time period she/he can be qualified, or a Diplomate who has been given additional time to recertify.  Those who are board qualified and who because of extenuating circumstances are unable to complete their certification before the seven (7) year limit may petition the Board of Directors in writing for a one-year extension.  Members who because of extenuating circumstances are unable to take their recertification exam before the ten (10) year limit may petition the Board of Directors in writing for a one-year extension.

    Inactive: A member who is not engaged in the active practice of foot and ankle surgery or does not hold surgical hospital privileges.

    Members may request inactive status by submitting a written request to the ABFAS office.  Letters should include the reason for the request including how the member meets the qualifying conditions.  If the member is requesting inactive status because of a medical condition, they must also submit a physician’s letter in support. ABFAS grants inactive status on an annual basis.

    ABFAS may grant a member inactive status for a maximum of five (5) cumulative years.  More than five (5) years of inactive status shall be considered a de facto resignation resulting in the member’s revocation. The member will need to pursue becoming reinstated as a member.

    While inactive, a member:

    (a)     does not pay annual fees.

    (b)     may not vote in ABFAS matters and/or elections.

    (c)     must successfully complete recertification or self-assessment requirements.

    ABFAS will report the member’s status as inactive for verification purposes.

    Incomplete: A board qualified podiatric surgeon who has taken and passed the Part I examinations but has not submitted necessary documentation to become fully qualified.

    Non-Compliant: A board qualified podiatric surgeon who has taken the necessary exams but has not submitted all the required documentation to be declared board-qualified.  A board-certified podiatric surgeon holding ABFAS certified status who is not current on ABFAS Maintenance of Certification requirements.

    None:  A podiatric surgeon who has not achieved ABFAS board status.

    Resigned:  An ABFAS member who has voluntarily given up certification.

    Retired: An ABFAS member who has completely retired and does not actively practice foot and ankle surgery.  Membersme may request retired status by submitting a written request to the ABFAS office.  A retired member may return to active status by following the policy for reinstatement; a retired member who seeks reinstatement does not need to pay past annual fees.

    Revoked: An ABFAS member’s status may be revoked for administrative or legal reasons.

    Administrative:  Unrelated to any professional review action (e.g., non-payment of annual fee or special assessment; failure to complete any maintenance of certification requirements).

    Legal:  Upon professional review related to any of the following possibilities: misrepresents certification status or provides false information to ABFAS; has cheated on any ABFAS exam; violates the Code of Ethics of the APMA; conviction of either a felony related to the delivery of a healthcare item or service; or any offense which causes his/her license revocation.

    ABFAS will automatically revoke a member’s or board qualified member’s status upon notification of a felony conviction or loss of license.  It will suspend the status upon learning of a license suspension and will notify the member/candidate of the suspension.  Those with suspended licenses can apply to the Board of Directors to reinstate their status upon removal of the license suspension.

    Suspended: When an ABFAS Board Qualified or Board Certified podiatric surgeon’s license has expired, ABFAS will change the physician’s status to “suspended”, and will notify the physician that until ABFAS has proof of license, they will stay in that status. 

  • My certification expired.  How do I reestablish my board certified status with ABFAS?

    A former ABFAS member who has lost certification due to failing the recertification examination or having her/his certification expire can apply to the Board of Directors to reestablish certification. Requirements are:

    • Proof of active, unrestricted medical license.

    • Documentation of one hundred (100) hours of continuing education credits within the last 24 months, of which sixty (60) hours must be in areas of foot and ankle surgery.

    • Proof of active hospital privileges commensurate with the level of recertification (foot and/or reconstructive rearfoot and ankle).

    • Payment of a special reestablishment fee of $1,000.

    • In addition, upon successful completion of retaking the recertification exam, payment of all past due annual fees.

    If the Board of Directors approves the request to reestablish, the former member has three (3) opportunities within three (3) years to successfully complete the recertification examination. During this period, the former member will have no ABFAS status. 

    If a former member passes the recertification examination, she/he will be restored to her/his former status with membership dates and any required recertification dates restored as originally established. 

    If a former member is unsuccessful in passing the examination during the three (3) years, she/he must apply as a new candidate and meet all requirements in effect at the time of new application. A former member may exercise use of this policy only once. 

    This policy applies to all former member certified beginning in 1991 even though said member no longer meet the eligibility requirements (e.g., formerly Alternate Method or PSR-12 only) for access to board certification.
  • I failed my recertification exam.  How do I reestablish my board certified status with ABFAS?

    A former ABFAS member who has lost certification due to failing the recertification examination or having her/his certification expire can apply to the Board of Directors to reestablish certification.  Requirements are:

    • Proof of active, unrestricted medical license.
    • Documentation of one hundred (100) hours of continuing education credits within the last 24 months, of which sixty (60) hours must be in areas of foot and ankle surgery.
    • Proof of active hospital privileges commensurate with the level of recertification (foot and/or reconstructive rearfoot and ankle).
    • Payment of a special reestablishment fee of $1,000.  In addition, upon successful completion of retaking the recertification exam, payment of all past due annual fees.

    If the Board of Directors approves the request to reestablish, the former member has three (3) opportunities within three (3) years to successfully complete the recertification examination. During this period, the former member will have no ABFAS status.

    If a former member passes the recertification examination, she/he will be restored to her/his former status with membership dates and any required recertification dates restored as originally established.

    If a former member is unsuccessful in passing the examination during the three (3) years, she/he must apply as a new candidate and meet all requirements in effect at the time of new application. A former member may exercise use of this policy only once.

    This policy applies to all former member certified beginning in 1991 even though said member no longer meets the eligibility requirements (e.g., formerly Alternate Method or PSR-12 only) for access to board certification.

  • My board certified status was revoked for not paying my annual fee. How do I reinstate my board certified status with ABFAS?

    A former member who was revoked for non-payment of annual fee may be reinstated provided:

    • The member’s time-limited ABFAS certificate has not expired.
    • The member can verify she/he has met her/his state’s continuing education requirements.
    • The member has an active, unrestricted license.
    • The member has active surgical hospital privileges.
    • The member pays all past due annual fees and late penalties for each year. There is no prorating of the annual fee.

    A former member who was revoked for non-administrative reasons such as license revocation must request to reestablish board certification in writing for Board of Directors approval. 

     

  • My board qualified status was revoked for not paying my annual fee. How do I reinstate my board qualified status with ABFAS?

    A former board qualified candidate who was revoked for non-payment of annual fee may be reinstated provided:

    • Their revoked status has not exceeded the seven (7) year window.

    • Upon reinstatement, candidate only has the remaining amount of time within window.

    • The candidate can verify she/he has met her/his state’s continuing education requirements.

    • The candidate has an active, unrestricted license.

    • The candidate has active surgical hospital privileges.

    • The candidate pays all past due annual fees and late penalties for each year. There is no prorating of the annual fee.

  • I certified before 1991 but failed to take the Self-assessment exam within the 10-year period. How do I reinstate my board certified status with ABFAS? 

    A former member whose certification expired due to failure to complete or pass the Self-assessment examination may be reinstated provided: 
    Requirements are:

    • They complete and pass the Self-assessment examination
    • They pay a $500 penalty fee
  • I have a retired status. How do I change it to active?

    A former member who has a “retired” status fee may be reinstated provided:

    • The member’s time-limited ABFAS certificate has not expired.
    • The member can verify she/he has met her/his state’s continuing education requirements.
    • The member has an active, unrestricted license.
    • The member has active surgical hospital privileges.
  • CERTIFICATION

    What is the difference between Board Qualified and Board Certified?

    Board Qualified status indicates that a podiatric surgeon has passed the Part I examination(s) for certification in Foot Surgery and/or Reconstructive Rearfoot/Ankle Surgery, and has an active license.  Individuals who are Board Qualified are not members of the ABFAS but are “in progress.”

    Board Certified status indicates that the individual has passed Part II examinations, holds hospital privileges, and has an active license. Individuals with Board Certified status are members of ABFAS. 
  • If I certified before 1990. What do I have to do to maintain certification?

    Complete a self-assessment exam every 10 years.

    You may take the examination in the eighth, ninth, or 10th year following your initial certification and similarly every 10 years.  For information about applying for recertification, see ABFAS Document 111 (Self-assessment Maintenance of Certification).
  • I certified after 1990. How often do I recertify?

    Every 10 years. To provide adequate opportunity to recertify before your certification expires, you have a three-year window in which to pass the recertification examination. You may take the examination in the eighth, ninth, or 10th year following your initial certification and similarly every 10 years.

    There are additional Maintenance of Certification requirements regarding case logs and number of CE credit.

    For information about applying for recertification, see ABFAS Document 112 (Recertification Maintenance of Certification).
  • As of 2017, what are the changes within the board certification process?

    Each year, there are minor changes to the
    examination process.

    For 2017 the following minor changes have been enacted:

    1. CBPS registration is now independent from Part II Case Review. Candidates can now register for the Part II CBPS exam after they are board qualified, even if they have not yet completed or registered for their Part II Case Review.  Candidates are still required to complete both the Part II CBPS exam and Part II Case Review before becoming certified. However, there is now the flexibility to complete both requirements anytime in the seven-year timeframe after becoming board qualified.


    2. Candidates who register for the 2018 Recertification exams will now need to submit case logs for the past two years prior to registering for the Recertification examination.
  • Do the Foot & Ankle Orthopedic surgeons have to take a Board certification test as well?

    Yes. The American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery (ABOS) offers a voluntary board certification.  ABOS candidates undertake a Part I written examination and a Part II oral examination.
  • CERTIFICATES

    How do I order a certificate?

    Please note that you must be certified to order a certificate.  In recognition of achieving board certified status, ABFAS will provide newly certified diplomates their first certificate at no charge.

    To order additional certificates, a certificate order form is available online by signing on to your personal profile page and selecting "Certificate: Reorders" in the left column.

  • I passed both the Foot and RRA certification exams, but only received a certificate indicating I am Foot certified.  Is this an error?

    If you achieve board certification in Foot and RRA in the same year, you will receive two separate certificates.  Jim Henry, the certificate vendor, ships all Foot certificates first; RRA certificates will follow.  Due to the high volume of certificates to be personalized and framed, please allow up to 15 weeks for processing.
  • EXAM ACCOMMODATIONS

    I have a disability and need special accommodations when taking my exam(s). What do I need to do?

    First, read the instructions for completing the Request for Accommodations, then fill out the form and return to ABFAS for approval. For Spring exams, you must apply for special accommodations at least 60 days prior to your exam, and at least 30 days prior for Part I exams.

    You'll find the instructions and the form here.
  • EXAM (CASE REVIEW)

    How do I log cases?

    Every candidate must log their surgical cases in an electronic database called the Podiatric Logging Service for Surgery (PLS) at https://www.podiatricsurgery.net/.  

    ABFAS recommends that you start logging cases as soon as you finish your residency program.
  • How do I document cases/surgeries if I am an attending surgeon at a residency program
    and I have the residents' names on the records?

    Documentation needs to support that:

    1. You are the primary treating provider on the preoperative assessment note/or H&P note and that you were actively involved in the surgical decision making for the patient.

    2. You are listed as the primary surgeon on the op report and on the anesthesia record.

    3. There is sufficient documentation to support that you were actively involved in the care of the patient post-operatively.

  • I finished residency before 2014.  Do I need to restart logging my cases in PLS, if I am in my second window of board qualification/certification process or do the cases I logged during my first window of board qualification/certification process still count for the Case Review process?  Do my 65 foot cases carry over?

    Your cases carry over but you need to continue logging your cases in PLS until you are board certified.
  • What does case review mean?

    See ABFAS Board Certification Document.  ABFAS randomly selects up to 13 procedures from those logged in PLS if a candidate applies for Foot Surgery certification. ABFAS randomly selects up to 26 procedures from those logged if a candidate applies for both Foot Surgery certification and Reconstructive Rearfoot/Ankle Surgery certification. If a candidate applies for RRA certification only, ABFAS randomly selects up to 13 RRA procedures from those logged. ABFAS may evaluate all procedures included in any case.

    Candidates must log a minimum of 65 cases in PLS for eligibility to submit cases for review for Foot Surgery certification and/or Reconstructive Rearfoot/Ankle Surgery (RRA) certification (see Appendix C). For Foot Surgery certification, a minimum of 30 cases must include surgery from the First Ray, Other Osseous and Reconstructive Rearfoot/Ankle categories listed in Appendix A. For RRA Surgery certification, a minimum of 30 RRA cases must be logged. Additionally, the RRA cases must include a minimum of 12 procedures from Appendix B. Candidates repeating the Case Review portion of the examination must ensure they have an adequate volume of cases to meet the requirement. Cases selected for Case Review in previous years will not be used for Case Review in subsequent years.

    • RRA procedures consisting of diagnostic operative arthroscopy, subtalar joint arthroereisis, foreign body/hardware removal, or ostectomy are not counted toward the required 30 total.
    • Open management of fractures must include some type of internal or external fixation.
    • Unproven or experimental procedures are not counted toward the required 65 total.
    • Removal of internal or external fixation devices or implants is not counted.
      Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) procedures and application of biological dressings are not acceptable.

  • What happens if I don’t have all of the materials or radiographs needed for a selected case?

    You need to submit all the materials that you have and the case will be scored accordingly. 

    You can still earn credit for the indications and management portions of the evaluation.  
  • Can I substitute a different case for one that has missing materials?

    No. Submit whatever you may have for evaluation and the case will be evaluated on the materials present.
  • What if I logged a procedure incorrectly and that case is chosen for review?

    It’s important to log your cases correctly since the computer-based template used to review and score your case is associated by how it was logged on PLS.
  • What if I fail my case logs? Do the ones I had been logging since start of practice still count toward the 65 minimum or do I have to start all over again?

    Candidates should continue to log cases until they are certified.  Candidates must log all surgical procedures performed no earlier than seven (7) years from the date of registration for the Part II Case Review (or when the candidate first achieved Board Qualified status).  Candidates must meet all requirements of the ABFAS Board Certification Document applicable to the year in which candidate registers for the Part II Case Review process.
  • Do fellowship cases count?

    Do fellowship cases count?

    Fellowship cases may be logged if they meet the following requirements:

    1. The Fellow must be listed as the surgeon of record in the intraoperative anesthesia record (no co-surgeon) and have documented involvement in the preoperative and postoperative care of the patient.
    2. Fellowship cases must meet other ABFAS case submission requirements. Such requirements may include, but are not limited to:
      • Performed in an accredited healthcare facility that may include, but is not limited to, a facility that is accredited by The Joint Commission, Joint Commission International, the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC), the American Osteopathic Association (AOA), or the American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities, Inc. (AAAASF). Medicare-approved facilities also qualify.
      • Meet all requirements of ABFAS Board Certification Document applicable to the year in which candidate registers for the Part II Case Review process.

  • Is it okay if I do not log a case if it had a poor outcome?

    No. You must log all surgical cases performed, otherwise, you are at risk of failing the hospital audit to verify surgical procedures performed.
  • EXAM (FEES)

    Where do my application and exam fees go?

    Application fees support ABFAS administrative costs including the meetings and work of the four committees that develop the exams.  ABFAS currently has 16 different exams that cover in-training didactic and CBPS, board qualification didactic and CBPS, board certification CBPS and case review, recertification didactic, and self-assessment didactic. In 2015-16, ABFAS administered more than 6,000 individual exams. To prepare for this, each year approximately 60 ABFAS board certified members volunteer more than two weeks of their time to meet and review the current exams’ performance, develop new items for future exams, and strategize new exam processes. In addition, for case review, more than 90 ABFAS board certified members volunteer for three days (four to five if you include travel time) to review more than 4,400 procedures submitted for those seeking board certification. During the time all of the committees meet, the volunteers are not seeing patients or performing surgery, which means that they are giving up not only their time but their income to make sure that ABFAS exams are of the highest quality.

    ABFAS volunteers, staff, and part of your annual fee also support the Podiatry Residency Resource (PRR) program, and the Council on Podiatric Medical Education (CPME) through the Residency Review Committee (RRC) and its residency program evaluation process (CREC) and the Joint Committee on the Recognition of Specialty Boards (JCRSB). And by the way, the one PRR staff works out of the ABFAS facilities.

    In recognition of your hard earned dollars, ABFAS has not increased its annual fees since 2006 nor its exam registration fees since 2013, and is concentrating on implementing administrative efficiencies so that it does not have to in the future.  ABFAS also does not charge an annual fee the first year for those who are newly board qualified, certified, or those who successfully took their recertification or self-assessment exam. As ABFAS is an independent organization that does not take industry sponsorship or funding like other associations, we appreciate all of your support and the value that you put on the podiatric foot and ankle surgery profession and becoming ABFAS certified.
  • Are ABFAS fees used for lobbying?

    No. Fees are applied to administrative costs only.
  • EXAM (GENERAL)

    When can I expect my exam results?

    Pass or fail results are posted online to your personal profile six to eight weeks after the end of the exam period (e.g., if the exam period is January 10-15, ABFAS will notify you of your results 6-8 weeks after January 15).  ABFAS will notify candidates via email when results have been posted.
  • What is the difference between the Self-assessment Examination and the Recertification Examination?

    If certified before 1991, there is no need to recertify, but it is necessary to take the self-assessment exam every 10 years to maintain board certification. If certified on or after 1991, you must take, and pass, a recertification exam every 10 years to maintain board certification. Documentation of current licensure and active surgical privileges at a hospital or surgery center is also required for self-assessment and recertification candidates at the time of registering for these exams. Self-assessment and Recertification candidates both must obtain 200 continuing education credits per each 10-year cycle.  Foot surgery and/or reconstructive rearfoot and ankle surgery candidates certified on or after 1991 must also submit hospital/surgery center case logs for the past two years.  Candidates will be prompted to upload the logs during the exam registration process. For detailed information, see ABFAS Document 111 (Self-assessment Maintenance of Certification) and ABFAS Document 112 (Recertification Maintenance of Certification).
  • What is Computer-based Patient Simulation (CBPS) testing?

    The purpose of the CBPS format is to evaluate candidates’ clinical reasoning skills, a type of testing called performance-based testing. The CBPS examines content knowledge and candidates’ ability to solve problems and make clinically relevant decisions. During the CBPS, candidates collect and analyze patient information and apply what they have learned, thus demonstrating their abilities to examine a patient (physical examination) and formulate a treatment plan.

    Candidates complete the CBPS by taking into account the relevant aspects of case management (patient history, physical examination, imaging, laboratory tests, diagnostic procedures, diagnosis, and treatment, and, in some cases, follow-up diagnoses and treatments). While collecting patient information, candidates must balance thoroughness with efficiency, as well as quality versus quantity. Because the CBPS is a timed examination, candidates need to pace themselves and not take too much time on any one point or decision.

    Field-testing has demonstrated that users who have practiced the CBPS have ample time to complete each case. While collecting information regarding the simulated case, candidates should remember that relevancy is paramount to successful resolution of a clinical problem. For example, if candidates are hesitant about whether a procedure is warranted, their decisions should be based on clinical indications. CBPS scoring is based on the relevancy of the processes or actions performed.
  • If I fail the ABFAS examination, do I get reported to an agency?

    No.
  • How much time do I have to complete the Part I process?  How many times can I fail/re-take the Part I exams?

    Dependent upon when and what type of residency program you completed, there are time limits you should be aware of with respect to becoming board qualified and certified.  See ABFAS Board Qualification Document.

    If you pass one section of the Part I exams, but fail another, you will receive credit for the section passed, but no board status.  If you fail one section of the Part I exams, you may retake the failed section during the following six years or the end of your eligibility window.
  • Can I wait 2-3 years before taking the Part I exams or do I have to take it in the Spring of my third year of residency?

    You may, but are not required, to take the Part I exams in the year you graduate from your residency program.  In most cases, residents in their final year who graduate in June, take the spring (usually March) exam.  But some do wait for the fall exam.

    Candidates may apply to take the Part I exams in the year prior to graduating from their residency program. See ABFAS Board Qualification Document.

  • EXAM (PREPARATION)

    How do I prepare for an examination?

    Review textbooks and recent journals. Additionally, our practice test will provide a sense of the types of questions that appear on the examinations. See practice exams here.  For more information, see ABFAS Board Qualification Document and ABFAS Board Certification Document which describes the areas tested on the examination(s).

    Review courses are available online; however, ABFAS does not endorse or recommend any course.
  • What is computer-adaptive testing?

    A computer-adaptive test is a computer-based examination that automatically tailors to the ability level of the individual examinee. As you answer each question, the computer assesses the response and selects the next question based on whether your previous answer was correct or incorrect.   
  • If I purposely miss answers, will my exam be easier?

    Answering questions incorrectly will result in an easier examination. However, since the examination is graded on difficulty, not percentage of correct answers, purposely answering questions incorrectly will result in a lower score. To pass the examination, you must answer every question to the best of your ability.
  • EXAM REGISTRATION

    Can I pay only the application fee when I apply?

    No. You must pay both the application fee and the examination fee when you apply. The non-refundable application fee is paid once per calendar year based on the year the exam takes place, regardless of the number of exams for which you are registered.  If you register for both Spring and Fall exams that occur in the same calendar year, the application fee is paid once in the Spring.  Fees are listed here.
  • I took the Board Qualified (or Board Certified) examination last year but did not pass. How do I reapply for the examination?

    Simply sign in to your profile page and select "Register for an Exam" in the left column.
  • Where are the testing sites?

    ABFAS contracts with Pearson VUE to administer examinations. We offer 200 testing sites nationwide as well as internationally. Testing sites are only used for Didactic and CBPS exams.  Case Review does not have an onsite attendance requirement.
  • What are the testing sites like?

    All Pearson VUE test centers, regardless of type, are designed to provide a consistent, standardized testing experience in a quiet, distraction-free environment. 
  • How do I apply for an examination?

    To apply, sign in to your profile page using your ABFAS user name and password, and select "Register for an Exam" in the left column.

    If you have forgotten your username and/or password, just click on the sign-in link and follow the instructions to retrieve them
  • When can I apply for an examination?

    Go to the Dates and Fees section of the website to find the list of examination dates. Review appropriate ABFAS documents for eligibility requirements.
  • How do I reschedule an exam?

    Sign in to your profile page and select the Pearson VUE link. From the Pearson VUE page, select the exam you want to reschedule, then select "Reschedule."

    If you have difficulty rescheduling an exam, please contact: scheduling@abfas.org.
  • How do I cancel an exam?

    To cancel an exam, you must submit your request to cancel in writing to: scheduling@abfas.org.
  • VERIFICATION

    How do I get a verification of certification for myself or a doctor I work for?

    Call ABFAS for assistance with verifications: 415-553-3084 or email verifications@abfas.org.
  • When the hospital calls ABFAS to check on my credentials, do they release whether I failed or passed an exam? What information is released and to whom?

    Hospitals and other credentialing organizations pay for individual verifications of podiatric surgeons undergoing the ABFAS certification process.  No information is released about whether a candidate passed or failed an exam.  The ABFAS verification report provides information about the candidate’s podiatric medical school graduation, completion of residency training, state licensure, and whether the candidate is an ABFAS board certified or board qualified podiatric surgeon and when that status was achieved and will expire.

    ABFAS is the only foot and ankle surgery certification board recognized by the Council on Podiatric Medical Education through the Joint Committee on the Recognition of Specialty Boards. The American Podiatric Medical Association delegated responsibility to recognize specialty certifying boards in podiatry to the Council.

    In accordance with standards published by the National Committee for Quality Assurance, ABFAS conducts primary source verification of the podiatric medical school graduation, completion of residency training, and state licensure for each ABFAS board certified and board qualified podiatric surgeon.